Top 20 Quotes from ‘A Game of Thrones’ // Arya’s Perspective

Books

Arya Stark from A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin is a relatable character who wishes to learn skills of swordsman rather than ballroom dancing. These are the top 20 quotes from the novel, from the chapters of Arya’s perspective:

(I am not affiliated with the author, publisher, etc. I am just a fan of the novels. I own nothing.)

  1. “The wolf pup loved her, even if no one else did.” [Narrator]
  2. “The longer you hide, the sterner the penance.” [Jon]
  3. “Know the men who follow you, and let them know you. Don’t ask your men to die for a stranger.” [Ned]
  4. “You have a wildness in you, child. ‘The wolf blood.’” [Ned]
  5. “Grieve for your friend, but never blame yourself.” [Ned]
  6. “And even the lie was…not without honor.” [Ned]
  7. “When the snows fall and the white winds blow, the lone wolf dies, but the pack survives. Summer is the time for squabbles. In winter, we must protect one another, keep each other warm, share our strengths.” [Ned]
  8. “You may be as different as the sun and the moon, but the same blood flows through both your hearts.” [Ned]
  9. “We have enemies who mean us ill. We cannot fight a war among ourselves.” [Ned]
  10. “She closed her eyes and bit her lip and sent the fear away.” [Narrator]
  11. “The monsters were still there, but the fear was gone.” [Narrator]
  12. A bruise is a lesson, and each lesson makes us better.”[Arya, thinking]
  13. “The cat was an ordinary cat, no more. The others expected a fabulous beast, so that is what they saw.” [Syrio]
  14. “Opening your eyes is all that is needing. The heart lies and the head plays tricks with us, but the eyes see true. Look with your eyes. Hear with your ears. Taste with your mouth. Smell with your nose. Feel with your skin. Then comes the thinking, afterward, and in that way knowing the truth.” [Syrio]
  15. “Are you men or dogs that you would threaten a child?” [Syrio]
  16. “…and you will now be speaking to me with more respect.” [Syrio]
  17. “The man who fears losing has already lost.” [Arya, thinking]
  18. “Never do what they expect.” [Arya, thinking]
  19. “This time the monsters did not frighten her. They seemed almost old friends.” [Narrator]
  20. “…and after that the darkness held no more terrors for her.” [Narrator]

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Reading “The Martian”

Books, Is it just me?, life

“The Martian,” written by Andy Weir is an intelligently written novel about an astronaut stranded on Mars. 

The most astounding aspect of this book is the main character – Mark Watney – and his incredible persistence and positive attitude. His actions are admirable and brave in a time when no one would blame him for giving up and panicking. 

Mark is the definition of how to act in an emergency situation. Instead of losing his motivation and giving into the harsh climate and near impossible circumstances, he continually skips right past all ideas of panic and self-pity and immediately moves forward with ideas and problem solving techniques. He’s resourceful and clever, extremely intelligent, and level headed to the point of making jokes in his unfortunate situation. 

How often in life do we waste time and energy on feeling sorry for ourselves? How much time could be saved by skipping past all the mourning and pity parties and instead, immediately getting to work on how to improve the scenario? We could accomplish so much more if we pushed back the natural impulse to panic and used that energy to focus on brainstorming a solution.

Mark Watney exhibits textbook courage and resourcefulness. He’s a perfect example of how we should all act in emergency events. Lost in the woods, car wrecks, losing a job, missing an important occasion, getting rejected from anything – these are things that happen everyday and require a calm, clever mind in order to push forward successfully. Panic, worry, pity – all of these are the opposite of helpfulness and won’t help anyone move forward with life and healing.

If Mark had, for any moment, lost faith and decided to stop trying, he would have easily died and perished in the Martian climate. He was forced to stay calm and keep his composure in order to survive.

“The Martian” is a great read. We should all follow Mark Watney’s example and skip the urges to panic and feel sorry for ourselves.

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Reading ‘Moby-Dick’

Books, life, Metaphors in Nature, Wildlife

Classic pieces of literature can be beautiful and enjoyable to read, analyze, and discuss. For many of these novels and short stories, regardless of the genre, I find it’s a hit or miss if I’ll enjoy dissecting the words and chapters. 

After pushing through several long, tedious chapters, I decided that Moby-Dick, written by Herman Melville, would fall into the category of “miss.” – the category of work I’ll never touch again, and maybe not even finish reading. 

As an adventure lover, this book was disappointing to me. Now, I’ll be honest – the chapters devoted to the narrative, the actual story of Ishmael and his insane Captain – those are great. Wonderfully written and smooth, the lines are clever and clear. 

It’s too bad that only about 10 percent of the novel is narrative. If we could extract those chapters filter out the unnecessary information, this book would be much shorter and a lot more entertaining.

There are far too many pages devoted to explaining whales – quite literally EVERYTHING there was to be know about whales back in 1851. Anatomy, different species, whaling industry, tools used for catching whales, the laws of possession of escaped whales, oil from whales, etc. Whales, whales, whales, whales, and more whales.

Learning and studying whales is one thing. And this could have been a textbook for whale courses in the 1800’s. However, I began reading with an expectation of reading a story. Not a textbook on nineteen century cetology. 

I have much respect for this novel, for what it is. It’s a classic, and I know that it brought joy to readers back when it was released. For me, personally, I didn’t finish it. I found that over halfway through, I stopped caring about the ending. I don’t even feel a desire to search for a summary on how it all plays out. Does the whale meet its end? Does the captain die? What about Ishmael?

I wish I cared more, but I don’t. Life is too short to finish unenjoyable novels. I respect this book. I just don’t like it very much. And if I were to die tonight, I’d rather I spend my last night of reading excited and interested in the characters.

Lots of respect, without love. It’s too bad.

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Quotes from ‘A Game of Thrones’ // Tyrion’s Perspective

Books, life

Few characters have the wit and personality of Tyrion Lannister. Here are the top quotes from A Song of Ice and Fire Book One: A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin:

(Disclaimer: I own none of these words. I’m just a fan enjoying the fantasy novels. Not affiliated with publishers or the author.)

Click here for Bran’s chapters
Click here for Catelyn’s chapters

  1. “Death is so terribly final, while life is full of possibilities.” [Tyrion]GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA
  2. “My mind is my weapon. My brother has his sword, King Robert has his warhammer, and I have my mind…and a mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge.” [Tyrion]
  3. “The Night’s Watch is a midden heap for all the misfits of the realm.” [Tyrion]
  4. “Most men would rather deny a hard truth than face it.” [Tyrion]
  5. “If a man paints a target on his chest, he should expect that sooner or later someone will loose an arrow at him.” [Tyrion]
  6. “We all need to be mocked from time to time, Lord Mormont, lest we start to take ourselves too seriously.” [Tyrion]
  7. “The young ones need to forget the lives they left behind them, the brothers and mothers and all that. A visit home would only stir up feelings best left alone.” [Mormont]
  8. “…a long summer always meant a long winter to come…” [Mormont]
  9. “You must make them understand. I tell you, my lord, the darkness is coming.” [Mormont]
  10. “They are running, my lord…but running from what?” [Lord Mormont]
  11. “…a vast white road with no beginning and no end and a dark abyss on either side.” [Narrator, on the Wall]
  12. “I decline to deliver any message that might get me killed.” [Tyrion]
  13. “The enemy were all vanquished or vanished.” [Narrator]
  14. “He was a bee in a stone honeycomb, and someone had torn off his wings.” [Narrator]
  15. “Submission and silence would have been his best defenses.” [Narrator]
  16. “Not impregnable, merely inconvenient.” [Tyrion]
  17. “His brother never untied a knot when he could slash it in two with his sword.” [Narrator]
  18. “His mouth had gotten him into this cell; it could damn well get him out.” [Narrator]GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA
  19. “I fought for you, but I do not love you.” [Bronn]
    “It was your blade I needed, not your love.” [Tyrion]
  20. “If a man was mad enough to put out his own eye, he was unlikely to be gentle to his enemies.” [Narrator]
  21. “No sword is strong until it’s been tempered.” [Lord Tywin]
  22. “Would the boy bring his wolves to war with him?” [Narrator, Tyrion thinking]
  23. “He left the living to look after the dead…” [Narrator]
  24. “Tywin was oft quiet in council, preferring to listen before he spoke.” [Narrator]
  25. “A man who fights for coin is loyal only to his purse.” [Kevan]GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA
  26. “Two battles do not make a war. We are far from lost.” [Ser Addam]

Thanks for reading!

Quotes from ‘A Game of Thrones’ // Catelyn’s Perspective

Books, life

Book One of A Song of Ice and Fire: A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin is an exciting adventure. Here are the best quotes from the chapters of Catelyn’s perspective:

(Disclaimer: I’m just a fan of the books and the author, no affiliation with the publishers, etc. I own none of these words, I only enjoy them.)

If you missed them, here are the quotes from Bran’s chapters.

  1. “He must learn to face his fears. He will not be three forever. And winter is coming.” [Ned]
  2. “There are darker things beyond the Wall.” [Catelyn]fullsizeoutput_d48
  3. “Take the children. Fill her halls with noise and shouts and laughter.” [Ned]
  4. “…the darkness left his eyes.” [Narrator]
  5. “Where the king goes, the realm follows.” [Catelyn]
  6. “There is grief in this message, Ned. I can feel it.” [Catelyn]
  7. “This is no time for false modesty.” [Catelyn]
  8. “His road is no crueler than yours…” [Maester Luwin]
  9. “Summer will end soon enough, and childhood as well.” [Ned]
  10. Never draw your sword unless you mean to use it.” [Ser Rodrik]GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA
  11. “The pain was her scourge..” [Narrator]
  12. “…it is one thing to be clever and another to be wise…” [Catelyn]
  13. “I am not accustomed to being summoned like a serving wench.” [Catelyn]
  14. “…Old sweet friends should never hesitate to rely upon each other.” [Littlefinger]
  15. “Varys was lord of nothing but the spiderweb, the master of none but his whisperers.” [Narrator]
  16. “She would not let them see her grief.” [Narrator]GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA
  17. “Those who come late to meals don’t eat.” [Masha]
  18. “…one elderly knight, armored in loyalty.” [Narrator]
  19. “Common travelers attract less notice.” [Catelyn]
  20. “The crossroads made for odd companions…” [Narrator]
  21. “As she had suspected, he was more interested in telling his own story than in hearing theirs. Singers loved nothing half so well as the sound of their own voices.” [Narrator]
  22. “…the Starks know no music but the howling of wolves.” [Marillion]
  23. “So long as the fire’s warm and the straw reasonably free of fleas, I am a happy man.” [Man of the Night’s Watch]
  24. “Courage he had, and strength, but there was no kindness in him, and little loyalty.” [Narrator, Catelyn, on Bronn]
  25. “A woman can rule as wisely as a man.” [Catelyn]
    “The right woman can.” [Ser Brynden]
  26. “…their marriage was made from politics, not passion.” [Ser Brynden]
  27. “The dwarf is here, and not by choice. Chains or not, he is my prisoner.” [Catelyn]
  28. “…the looming mass of the great mounted shrouded in night, as black as a starless sky.” [Narrator]
  29. “Torches just blind you. On a clear night like this, the moon and the stars are enough.” [Mya]
  30. “…the wind was a living thing, howling around them like a wolf in the waste.” [Narrator]
  31. “No castle is impregnable.” [Ser Brynden]
  32. “…and yet in life she had never shed a tear. So in death, the gods had decreed that she would know no rest until her weeping watered the black earth of the Vale, where the men she had loved were buried.” [Narrator on Alyssa Arryn]
  33. “…it seemed cruel for a day to dawn so fair and end so foul…” [Narrator]
  34. “Too fond of the sight of blood on that golden sword of his.” [Ser Rodrik on Jaime]
  35. “…she was weary of futile arguments with her sister.” [Narrator]
  36. “You named yourself battle commander. Command.” [Catelyn]
  37. “Your father is not fearless. He is brave, but that is very different.” [Catelyn, to Robb]
  38. “You want cold cunning, I should think, not courage.” [Catelyn]
  39. “She had put despair and fear aside, as if they were garments she did not choose to wear…but now she saw that she had donned them after all.” [Narrator]
  40. “She masked her fears behind a face kept still and stern.” [Narrator]
  41. “A child sees an obstacle, and his first thought is to run around it or knock it down. A lord must learn that sometimes words can accomplish what swords cannot.” [Catelyn]GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA
  42. “…but some truths did not bear saying, and some lies were necessary.” [Narrator]
  43. “She would need to choose her words with care, and do her best to take no offense from his.” [Narrator]
  44. “Father says you should let the men see you before a battle.” [Robb]
  45. “It was a terrible sound, a frightening sound, yet there was music in it too.” [Narrator, on Grey Wind’s howling]
  46. “Grieve for them. Honor them for their valor. But not now. You have no time for grief.” [Catelyn]
  47. “We have won a battle, not a war.” [Catelyn]GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA
  48. “She wondered if indeed her heart would ever lift again…” [Narrator]
  49. “Wait, let these two kings play their game of thrones.” [Ser Stevron]
  50. “Ned stood at my side once more…but he is gone, and a hundred Whispering Woods will not change that.” [Catelyn]
  51. “I will mourn for Ned until the end of my days, but I must think of the living.” [Catelyn]
  52. “What have we fought for, if we are to put all back as it was before?” [Lord Bracken]

Thanks for reading!

Quotes from “Jane Eyre” by Charolette Bronte

Books

Here is the PDF of all the quotes from Jane Eyre that stuck out to me. Many of them I used in my five part post about what this novel taught me about life. This PDF is quotes only – no insights, no comments, just straight quotes from the book.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jane Eyre Quotes

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Carly Twelve

Invaluable Life Advice from Jane Eyre (Part Five)

Books

This is the fifth and final post providing a collection of quotes from Jane Eyre. My hope is to read between the lines and spread the wisdom in these pages crafted by Charolette Brontë in 1847.

Here are the other four parts in case you missed them:

Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four

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1 – Never let pride stand in the way of doing what’s right. 

“I was not heroic enough to purchase liberty at the price of caste.” Narrator (Chapter 3)

Doing the right thing is often difficult because it can come with backlash and judgement from those around us. However, it’s important to remember that facing moments of backlash is nothing compared to the regret that comes with neglecting to do the right thing.

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2 – You are strong enough to handle what the world has dealt you. 

“Yet it would be your duty to bear it, if you could not avoid it. It is weak and silly to say you cannot bear what it is your fate to be required to bear.” Helen Burns (Chapter 6)

“Why was I always suffering, always brow-beaten, always accused, forever condemned? Why could I never please? Why was it useless to try to win anyone’s favor?” Narrator (Chapter 2)

When going through hard times, it can often feel as if the universe is out to get us. Always remember that you are strong enough to face whatever is thrown your way.

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3 – Do not let day to day, petty issues infect your mood.  

“I can so clearly distinguish between the criminal and his crime; I can so sincerely forgive the first while I abhor the last; with this creed, revenge never worries my heart, degradation never too deeply disgusts me, injustice never crushes me too low. I live in calm, looking to the end.” Helen Burns (Chapter 6)

Looking at the big picture in life helps to reduce the significance of the daily stressors that can seem life altering in the moment. Always remember the most important things in life and don’t let anything less get you down.

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4 – Do not let fear get in the way of your goals and dreams. 

“The fear of failure in these points harassed me worse than the physical hardships of my lot; those these were no trifles.” Narrator (Chapter 7)

“It is a very strange sensation to inexperienced youth to feel itself quite alone in the world; cut adrift from every connection, uncertain whether the port to which it is bound can be reached, and prevented by many impediments from returning to that it has quitted. The charm of adventure sweetens that sensation, the glow of pride warms it; but then the throb of fear disturbs it;” Narrator (Chapter 11)

Fear is often the biggest obstacle in the path of reaching our dreams. “What if I fail?” “Will my friends laugh at me?” “Will I be taken seriously?” “Am I good enough?”

Fear is understandable and everyone faces it at some point in life. Yet that feeling of being afraid to fail does not mean you shouldn’t pursue your goals. On the other hand, it probably means you need to go for it. Don’t let fear hold you back, just as Jane continues on her journey is this novel even though she is scared to venture out.

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5 – Don’t try to be like everyone else – humans are flawed.

“Such is the imperfect nature of man – such spots are there on the disk of the clearest planet; and eyes like Miss Scatcherd’s can only see those minute defects, and are blind to the full brightness of the orb.” Narrator (Chapter 7)

“Most things free-born will submit to anything for a salary;” Mr. Rochester (Chapter 14)

The goals others have, the items they crave, and the lifestyle they dream of are all irrelevant. What matters is what you want, what your goals are, and how you strive to reach those goals. Advice from others is great, but you should always remember that everyone else has a different dream in mind. One person’s path to success with look absolutely different than another.

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6 – The heart’s feelings are not easily changed.

“I could not unlove him now, merely because I found that he had ceased to notice me – because I might pass hours in his presence, and he would never once turn his eyes in my direction – because I saw all his attentions appropriated by a great lady, who scorned to touch me with the hem of her robes as she passed – who, if ever her dark and imperious eye fell on me by chance, would withdraw it instantly…” Narrator (Chapter 18)

“There was nothing to cool or banish love in these circumstances, though much to create despair.” Narrator (Chapter 18)

“Blasphemy against nature! Every good, true, vigorous feeling I have, gathers impulsively round him. I know I must conceal my sentiments; I must smother hope; I must remember that he cannot care much for me.” Narrator (Chapter 17)

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When heartbroken or craving someone intensely, feeling angry at yourself is never a good response. The heart is going to want people and things that are not good for you, not right for you, or completely out of your reach. Don’t let yourself be mad at your heart for wanting things it shouldn’t. It’s natural to feel this way, so talk about it, write about it, discuss it with a friend, and grow from it.

Anger will never force your heart to change its desires.

7 – Words are much more painful than “sticks and stones.”

“Better tire my limbs than strain my heart…” Jane to herself (Chapter 25)

“And with that answer, he left me. I would much rather he had knocked me down.” Narrator (Chapter 34)

“My rest might have been blissful enough, only a sadheart broke it.” Narrator (Chapter 28)

“I so dreaded a reply that would crush me with despair. To prolong doubt was to prolong hope.” Narrator (Chapter 36)

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Words can cut deep and wound the soul. We all have scars on our hearts from the harsh words others have spoken. Always be careful what you say to others because a physical wound will heal, but a wound to the mind can last a lifetime.

8 – The mind holds the most beauty.

“Your mind is treasure, and if it were broken it would be my treasure still…” Mr. Rochester to Jane (Chapter 27)

“My very soul demands you…” Mr. Rochester (Chapter 37)

“…all the sunshine I can feel is in her presence.” Mr. Rochester (Chapter 37)

“I have worn it since the day I lost my only treasure…” Mr. Rochester on his bronze scrag (Chapter 37)

“…this obvious absence of passion in his sentiments toward her, that my ever-torturing pain arose.” Narrator (Chapter 18)

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Society is quick to value beauty as a result of the way people look. But the true beauty is found in the soul or the mind; the way a person treats others, the intelligence he/she holds, the quirks that are apparent, the music that she listens to when she’s sad – all of this is what leads to real beauty.

Instead of trying to look more appealing on the outside, we should strive to better our minds because that’s where the true value lies.

9 – Learn from those you admire.  

“…she was qualified to give those who enjoyed the privilege of her converse a taste of far higher things.” Narrator (Chapter 9)

“…she was smart in all she did, and had a remarkable knack of narrative…” Narrator (Chapter 4)

“What a smile! I remember it now, and I know that it was the effluence of fine intellect, of true courage…” Narrator on Helen Burns (Chapter 7)

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When that feeling of deep admiration hits, it must have some reasoning behind it. Why do you admire certain people and not others? Take the time to evaluate the feelings and learn from those you hold in high regards. Though these people are only human, they may possess qualities you wish to gain yourself. We typically learn best from others.

10 – Never lose hope. 

“…I believed in the existence of other and more vivid kinds of goodness, and what I believed in I wished to behold.” Narrator (Chapter 12)

The world can be a terrible place sometimes, but we can’t let the darkness overtake our hopes of finding happiness. No matter what happens, don’t lose your faith in the world and its people. Goodness does exist if only we can learn to look past the dark.

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Thank you for reading this post. I appreciate it and would love to hear comments about what others see in this amazing novel.

Carly Twelve

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